Essential Oil Suppliers – Who Can You Trust?

Posted on: July 17th, 2009 by
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Essential oils have changed considerably since their inception in modern day aromatherapy practice. In Ancient Egypt, plant oils used were different to the essential oils of today and many of these ancient ‘oils’ were made at source. In other words, people made a lot of their own plant oils and knew what was going into them. Today, it is a much different practice.

In the UK, when common usage of modern day essential oils became popular, it was in the beauty and massage industry they were used the most; not many people really knew about the therapeutic powers of essential oils and essential oils were often used for their ‘nice smells’ rather than for healing power. Today, this is true in the USA with the use of fragrance oils, which are synthetically made and are not from nature’s plants; indeed, many ‘essential oils’ are also not of the qualitative and therapeutic standards required for aromatherapy practice, even some of those which claim to be so.

As the use of essential oils for their therapeutic properties has risen, people are learning to educate themselves more on what they are actually buying. It is difficult to know if the information being supplied by the large essential oil companies (and some smaller companies too) is both correct and believable.

Some guidelines for buying from a true and pure essential oil supplier include:

- the reputation and the history of the essential oil supplier – if you have heard rumors or ‘bad press’ about a particular essential oil supplier, you may believe in the old adage ‘there is no smoke without fire’. Check your facts, do your own research and decide for yourself.

- pricing of essential oils – if you study essential oils, you will have some idea of what is a reasonable charge for a particular essential oil – for example, rose essential oil is a really expensive oil. If you see it being sold really cheaply, its probably not the ‘real deal.’

- check the latin names of the essential oil – true essential oils will have come from the botanical plant of the same name and not from a ‘blend’ or ‘infusion’ of a synthetically engineered oil in a factory.

- essential oils go through a number of qualitative tests for evaluation. These include gas chromatography and mass spectometry (more on that in subsequent posts) and some essential oil suppliers will allow you access to the GS/MS reports.

-ask where the essential oil supplier gets their essential oils from – essential oils are available from plants which only grow in certain areas of the world. For example, if someone tells you they buy their frankincense essential oil from a local farmer and they live in England, alarm bells should be ringing!

- if possible, get a recommendation of a good essential oil supplier from a friend or professional you trust.

Currently, regulation governing the sale of essential oils is little or non-existent in most areas of the world so it is up to the consumer to work out who is ‘trustworthy’ and who is not. Studying essential oils helps you to have some knowledge of what you are looking for – after all, knowledge is power! But, even then, it can be difficult to identify a trustworthy supplier of true essential oils.

In my time I have spent living in the USA, I have learned from peers, forums, publications and my own internet searches and research about the essential oil suppliers in the USA; after 3 years, I am only just beginning to ‘trust’ some of the information I have on essential oil suppliers who supply the ‘real deal’. I am not going to post a list of the ‘good guys’ and the ‘bad guys’ on my aromatherapy blog, but if anyone has any thoughts or ideas on essential oil suppliers, I would love to hear from you, either by posting a comment at the end of this post or through my personal contact information in the right hand side column of the blog!

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Lemongrass Essential Oil

Posted on: July 17th, 2009 by
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Lemongrass Essential Oil
Lemongrass Essential Oil

Lemongrass Essential Oil

 Lemongrass is another lesser known essential oil but it a light and fresh essential oil with a number of uses; traditionally used in Indian Medicine for fevers and disease, it has also been used as an insect repellent – quite apt for this time of year!

It can be an irritant to those with sensitive skin so should be used with care. However, for anyone who has experience of using essential oils with animals, it is reportedly a natural way to repel fleas from dogs…

For more information read Lemongrass Essential Oil, my latest essential oil profile.

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An Essential Oil Glossary – Understanding Aromatherapy Terms

Posted on: July 15th, 2009 by
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Aromatherapists use some complicated terms to describe essential oils and what properties essentials hold. To the student of aromatherapy this can be very confusing. A simple list or glossary of essential oil terms can help.

There are many aromatherapy books out there – the good ones will contain a glossary of essential oil terms and their meanings. Some are self-explanantory, such as deodorant; others are more complex, such as emmenagogue.

Then there are the terms used to describe the odor of an essential oil. What does ‘green’ mean? It doesn’t mean the essential oil is green in color, in fact it describes an essential oil which has a grassy odor! Of course, many aromatherapists use different terms and can interpret things slightly differently but in general there are some common aromatherapy terms used by most.

As an initial student of aromatherapy, I found the composition of an essential oil glossary helpful and still add to it today, as I continue to learn, or re-visit, new terms. If you want to know more about an essential oil glossary and some of the more common aromatic terms, check out An Essential Oil Glossary of Aromatic Terms.

If you have any suggestions or thoughts on essential oil terms please let me know!

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Avicenna ‘s Contribution to Modern Day Aromatherapy

Posted on: July 13th, 2009 by
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Although it is generally accepted that Rene-Maurice Gattefosse was the ‘founder’ of ‘modern’ day aromatherapy, there were many great herbalists and physicans who contributed much to plant medicine throughout the centuries and who inadvertently influenced aromatherapy as we know it today.
Last week, I profiled Hippocrates use of herbs and medicinal plants in plant medicine; Hippocrates became the inspiration of, and influence on, one of the greatest Arab physicians of all time – Avicenna (980 A.D. – 1037 A.D.). Avicenna (also known as Ib’n Sina) was accredited with the invention of the refrigerated coil in the distillation process of plants and made it possible to distil essential oils and floral waters (hydrosols). Although, distillation was in practice before Avicenna’s invention, the refrigerated coil improved the distillation process.
One of the plants which Avicenna researched and experimented with a lot was the rose (Rosa damascena). The rose was revered in the ancient Arab world and consequently the rose became on one of the first flowers Avicenna distilled with the refrigerated coil.
Today, Avicenna is still a great influence on modern day medicine and plant medicine and it is possible to study the healing traditions Avicenna and the Middle East in many healing and medicinal practices.
To learn more on Avicenn’as work read The Use of Plants in Medicine by Avicenna

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Thyme Essential Oil

Posted on: July 9th, 2009 by
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The herb Thyme produces a number of different essential oils, depending on the distillate and depending on the location in which the herb is grown. Not only is this confusing (they all bear the same botanical name) but it can cause unwanted side effects if you do not know which variety of Thyme essential oil you have.
The two most common Thyme essential oils used in aromatherapy are sweet (or common) Thyme and red Thyme; red Thyme is the more aggressive essential oil whereas sweet Thyme is more gentle. The reasons for this lie in the fact that red Thyme essential oil is composed primarily of the chemical component phenol and sweet Thyme essential oil is made up mainly of alcohols, which are gentler in their actions. However, red Thyme essential oil does have its uses in aromatherapy – if you know what to use it for, exercise caution and do not use it in contra-indicated situations.
Read the latest Thyme essential oil profile I’ve added to learn more…

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The Use Of Clove Essential Oil in Aromatherapy

Posted on: July 8th, 2009 by
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Clove essential oil is complex – in that there is clove bud, clove leaf and clove stem essential oils to choose from! However, in aromatherapy, clove bud essential oil is the more commonly used because of the slightly less ‘toxicity’ of its chemical make-up. It contains the active ingredient of eugenol which is responsible for some of the cautions associated in the use of clove essential oil.
Clove bud essential oil is used in aromatherapy and has strong antiseptic properties, amongst others. Although caution should be used when using clove essential oil, used in low dilutions (of less than 1%), clove oil can be used safely and effectively to treat a number of problems.
Read clove essential oil to learn more….

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