Native American Use of Plants in Spiritual Healing

Posted on: October 30th, 2017 by
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Healing through plants and herbs

Healing through plants and herbs

Following the latest trilogy of aromatically witchy themed articles, and with the advent of the Mexican Day of the Dead almost upon us, I thought that it would be interesting to take a quick look at some of the traditional plants and herbs used by the Native American people.

Various plants and herbs are used for spiritual rituals including sage (Salvia spp., Artemisia spp.), bear berry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), red cedar (Juniperus virginiana), sweet grass (Hierochloe odorata) and tobacco (Nicotiania spp.). Other sacred plant mixtures used are cornmeal and pollen, and a Kinnikinnick.

The Use of a Kinnikinnick in American Indian Ceremonies

The ancient Algonquian Indian word of Kinnikinnick means a ceremonial or ritual botanical mix of various herbs and plants; the bear berry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) plant, in particular, may be used individually in this ceremonial offering or in a mix of other plants and herbs, sometimes a mix of as many as thirty different plant species. Each plant or herb used in the botanical mix is prepared and dried separately, before being blended together and placed in a leather pouch.

A Kinnikinnick is used in a number of different ways:

  • it is used for smudging (the sacred practice of burning herbs)

  • it is worn to keep substances away which may be harmful

  • it is carried as an offering

  • it is packed in bags and baskets with items used in ceremonies in order to keep them healthy.

Plants and Herbs Used in a Kinnikinnick

The following plants and herbs are an example of those used to make a Kinnikinnick:

  • Bergamot* (Monarda spp.) - all plant parts may be used

  • Angelica* (Angelica atropurpurea) – use of the leaves

  • Canadian Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) – use of the needles

  • Goldenrod (Solidago spp.)- use of the leaves and blossoms

  • Indian Tobacco (Lobelia inflata) – use of the leaves

  • Sage* (Artemisia spp., Salvia spp.) - use of the leaves and bark

  • Sunflower* (Helianthus annuus) – use of the leaves

  • Tansy* (Tanacetum vulgare, Tanacetum huronese) – use of all plant parts

  • Willow (Salix spp.) - use of bark and leaves

  • Yarrow* (Achillea spp.) - use of all plant parts

  • Mountain Mints (Pycnanthemum spp.) - use of all plant parts

  • Juniper* (Juniperus spp.) - use of leaves, bark and berries.

*plants used as essential oils in aromatherapy practice.

The Native American Practice of Smudging

Smudging is a sacred American Indian practice which involves the burning of herbs for both purification and prayer; this is a practice which is carried out by most American Indians. The burning of the herbs releases many fragrant aromas from the oils released by the plants which enhances the experience.

Prayers are then offered within the smoke of the herbs. Smudging is a time of spiritual healing and may involve a gathering of people for the passing of the burning herbs from one to another in collective prayer to the Creator. Two common plants used in smudging are sweet grass and sage. Other herbs used for smudging, either individually or in blends, include bergamot (Monarda spp.), yarrow (Achillea spp.), mesquite (Prosopis spp.), bear berry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) and tobacco (Nicotiania spp.). In spiritual rituals, the smoke from the burning of sage and sweet grass is said to take prayers and sadness up towards the spirits.

As an alternative to smudging with burning herbs, particularly in a restricted area and you want to “clear a space” as oppose to smudging for a spiritual purpose, I recommend using hydrosols as discussed in this article.

The Study of Plants in Aromatherapy

It is interesting to examine how different people use plants and herbs and compare the practices to how we use plants in our own practice, as either in use with the herb itself, or as an oil in aromatherapy practice. We can also value the use of that plant in our own aromatic gardens. Plants truly are versatile and healing in many ways, when we examine the number of ways in which they are used. To learn more about how plants are used in aromatherapy practice, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program!

About the Author of This Article:

  • The author of this article has a 20 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She has taken the online Master Gardener short course series with the University of Oregon. Sharon works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens.

For further reading:

  • Kavasch, E. Barrie, Baar, Karen 1999 American Indian Healing Arts USA: Bantam

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Aromatically Witchy Blends from the Garden

Posted on: October 23rd, 2017 by
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Aromatic Blends from the Garden

Aromatic Blends from the Garden

In concluding our aromatically witchy-themed trilogy for October, I am sharing three aromatic blends from the garden which could be regarded as aromatically witchy (aka healing). The garden, or the area where plants were naturally found growing in the neighborhood, has traditionally been the source of many aromatic potions over the year, and it is here where many “witches” drew from to make up healing blends, before the availability of modern day medicine.

In this final article I am taking a brief look at the name “hedgewitch” and sharing three aromatic blends from the garden (note: these plants may not be in season at the time of writing, depending upon where you live in the world, but save the recipe for a future blend when you need it!)

Hedgewitch or Healer?

Life could be considered much “simpler” in the past and many people did not go past the “border” of their own town, village, or homestead. Such borders were traditionally marked by fences or hedgerows.

The hedgewitch lived on the edge of the community, often on the boundary marked by the hedge; hence the term hedgewitch. A hedgewitch made her living through herbalism, healing, blessings and spells, midwifery, magical charms, and curses. A hedegwitch had a very close relationship with nature which was not widely understood by everyone. However, she was generally respected by the community.

Although the practice of aromatherapy may not be directly related to hedgewitchery, it can be seen that hedgewitchery has a similar relationship with plants and nature just as an experienced aromatherapist and herbalist should if they are to truly understand the tools of their trade and use them to their full advantage. In essence: All “witches” are healers, and they really do not deserve the negative connotations associated with the name witch.

Aromatic Teas from the Garden

Aromatic and herbal teas are one of the easiest blends to make direct from your garden. Just be aware of the therapeutic properties and/or cautions associated with the plant which you use. Some examples of herbal and aromatic teas that you can make from the garden include chamomile, peppermint, spearmint, and lemon balm (melissa). The following basic recipe can be followed:

  • Collect two tablespoons of fresh plant material* from the garden.
  • Add directly to 8 oz of boiling water.
  • Allow to steep; the longer the steep, the stronger the tea.
  • Use a strainer on top of a cup and pour.

*check which part of the plant to collect. For example, in the case of chamomile, collect the flowers but in the case of peppermint, collect the leaves. 

Tip: Add honey to sweeten. 

Aromatically Infused Waters from the Garden

Bach flower remedies and hydrosols can also be made with plants harvested from the garden. Different plants have different purposes, so if you go this route, make sure you know the plants suitable for making flower remedies and/or hydrosols (which requires distilling equipment).

Another fun way to enjoy plants from your garden and aromatically infused in water is to add aromatic petals and leaves to your bath water. I would suggest using rose petals, lavender buds, or chamomile flowers/plant parts for a relaxing bath. Add one cup of your chosen plant material to a warm bath and let it infuse around you as you relax!

Aromatic Ice Cubes from the Garden

It might be past summer, but save this aromatically witchy recipe for next year for summer drinks with both design and flavor! Borage flowers make a pretty (and healthy) addition to any summer drink with this simple recipe:

  • Fill up ice cube tray with water.
  • Add one borage flower to each compartment.
  • Freeze.
  • Add to summer drinks and/or cocktails.

Learn More About Using Aromatic Plants with Sedona Aromatherapie

If you would like to learn more about aromatic plants, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM Program.

  • The author of this article has a 20 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She has taken the online Master Gardener short course series with the University of Oregon. Sharon works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens.

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An Aromatically Witchy-themed Garden

Posted on: October 16th, 2017 by
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Witch Hazel is a great plant for an aromatically witchy-themed garden

Witch Hazel is a great plant for an aromatically witchy-themed garden

In the second post of the October trilogy related to Halloween and all things aromatically witchy, we are taking a look at some of the aromatic plants which could cast a spell on your garden visitors in one way or another. Some have traditionally been used for love spells and potions; others, by my own interpretation and assessment, conjure up an image of magic in one way or another. And, above all else, don’t forget the aroma of many of these plants, which is, to me as an aromatherapist, the most bewitching power of any plant!

Some of these ancient plants, although used for their therapeutic properties in one form or another, were not as closely analyzed and scruntinized for their chemical make-up as they are today. Common people did not have access to the science of plants and it is probable that for this reason certain species were perceived to be “magical.”

This article takes a look at some of the folklore and magic associated with certain aromatic plants and it is by no means intended to be scientific “proof” of the historical claims of each plant. It is simply a guide to planting some aromatically witchy plants for your garden!

Aromatic Herbs for Love Spells

Many plants have been used to conjure up a love spell or two, including the herbs basil, lovage, and fennel.

According to folklore, a gift of basil (Ocimum basilicum) would cause the recipient to fall deeply in love with the giver, and they would never stray. In Romania, folklore goes as far to say that a gift of basil represented an official engagement. In Italy, a woman who places a pot of basil on her balcony is said to be looking for love – so be careful, where you place your basil!1 Basil has a sweet, herbaceous, even spicy aroma.

Lovage (Levisticum officinale) is a common herb which has been used in love charms, perhaps in part to the tendancy to break down its name into “love-ache.”2 Some say that lovage can aid in both love and sexuality and it has an ability to draw in a new lover.3 Lovage is another plant with a similar aroma to basil, so it would compliment it well within a herb garden.

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is often used in rituals to awaken love, 4 along with acacia. Fennel has an anise-like, camphoraceous aroma and its umbels of yellow flowers make a show among many of the more traditional, green herbs of the garden.

Aromatic Plants which Inspire Love and Magic in the Garden

Nature sometimes has a way of indicating its purpose with subtle indicators to be found in its plants – or is that how humans interpret them? Take lilac (Syringa spp.) for example. Several lilac species have heart-shaped leaves. Common lilac flowers in the spring in a variety of colors that includes lilac, deep purple, white, and pink. Lilac is a deciduous shrub or small tree with an amazing aroma. It can probably cast its own love spell through aroma and appearance alone, whether or not it has been used in an ancient love spell!

Then there is rose (Rosa spp.). As a member of the Rosaceae plant family, rose has pinnate leaves, with serrated edges, that are arranged spirally. The flowers have five sepals, five petals and several stamens that are arranged in many ways. However, take a close look at a rose petal. Although not a true “heart” shape, you can see how rose petals are used as a symbol of love through their shape, texture, and (if aromatic) fragrance.

Viola, of the Violaceae plant family, does have heart-shaped leaves, and although not aromatic, it is used in herbal medicine. Its beautiful flowers consist of five petals, arranged in a memorizing symmetry and I find these little flowers bewitching in the garden as they are one of the few flowers here which continue to bloom through both sun and snow in the winter months.

Finally I would be remiss in closing out this article without mentioning witch hazel(Hamamelis virginiana), as an aromatically witchy plant for the garden. Witch hazel is one of the few plants in the aromatic garden which blooms from Fall through early winter with, in my opinion, some witchy looking flowers! It has spidery-looking flowers of white, yellow, orange, or red. The flowers have a spicy fragrance. It has alternate, oval-shaped leaves.The fruit is expelled upon maturity from its capsule – hence its name, snapping hazel. Perhaps a magical plant in more ways than one!

We can all use a little bit of love and magic in our lives and the garden is a great place to create an aromatically witchy theme for year-round enjoyment. Add in some plants which are traditionally used in broom-making, and you have many ingredients at your disposal to cast a spell on those who choose to wander through the plants. My closing thought is that aren’t all aromatic gardens a little witchy, given the aromatic ingredients, and their subsequent therapeutic powers? Enjoy!

Learn More About Aromatic Plants with Sedona Aromatherapie

If you would like to learn more about aromatic plants, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM Program.

References:

  1. Witchipedia website, Basil, available from: http://www.witchipedia.com/herb:basil

  2. Alchemy-Works website, Lovage, available from: http://www.alchemy-works.com/levisticum_officinale.html

  3. Herb Magic website, Lovage Root, available from: http://www.herbmagic.com/lovage.html

  4. Egyptian Witchcraft website, Magical Properties of Herbs, Plants, and Trees, available from: https://www.egyptian-witchcraft.com/magical-properties-of-herbs-plants-and-trees/

  • The author of this article has a 20 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens.

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Aromatic Plants for Broom Making

Posted on: October 9th, 2017 by
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Aromatic Plants were Used for Broom Making in Medieval Times

Aromatic Plants were Used for Broom Making in Medieval Times

Aromatic plants were used in a variety of ways in Medieval Europe, and were used in broom making, as strewing herbs, in love spells, and as healing potions. As the “season” of witches and Halloween is almost upon us, over the next three weeks I will be looking more closely at these topics and how many of the aromatic plants we use today were popularized by witches and healers in Medieval times. Today’s article focuses on a tradition that is almost lost in today’s modern world: Broom making.

Types of Plants for Different Broom Uses

Brooms were common in Medieval Europe; their association with witches gave them a dubious notoriety but in fact brooms had many uses in every day life. Just as many herbs and plants were used for medicinal purposes, some aromatic plant species were also traditionally used to craft brooms.

According to a research report, Plants Traditionally Used to Make Brooms in Several European Countries, on the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine website, different types of plants were used for brooms, depending on how the broom was going to be used. Local folk nomenclature classified brooms as soft, hard, big or small and were named for their main use. Examples include yard broom and house broom.

Plants from the Ericaceae, Fabaceae and Betulaceae botanical families were used for yard brooms whereas plants from the Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, Apiaceae, Poaceae and Liliaceae botanical families were used for house brooms. House brooms were soft brooms whereas yard brooms were hard brooms.

Aromatic Plants for Broom Making

Brooms made from aromatic plants were popular for cleaning ovens and stoves because they helped to eliminate any odors. Aromatic plants that were used for broom making include fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), myrtle (Myrtus communis), bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) and wild tobacco (Nicotiana glauca).

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is a member of the Apiaceae plant family and it is an ancient herb which was believed to ward off evil spirits. On a practical note, the oil extracted from this plant is antiseptic and antimicrobial.

Myrtle (Myrtus communis) is a member of the Myrtaceae plant family and also possesses antiseptic and astringent properties. The essential oil is used for many respiratory and immune issues.

Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) is a member of the Lauraceae plant family and is also an ancient herb which was used by the Greeks and the Romans as a crown of victory in sporting events and battle. The essential oil has antiseptic aand antibacterial properties.

Aromatic Plants as Strewing Herbs

In addition to making brooms from aromatic plants, aromatic plants were also used as strewing herbs in Medieval times. Strewing herbs were scattered on the floor after the floor was swept. The purpose of strewing herbs was to release fragrant and astringent aromas when people walked on them. Some aromatic herbs were also used as insecticides and disinfectants in this way.

Popular aromatic strewing herbs and plants included sage (Salvia officinalis), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), rose (Rosa spp.), sweet marjoram (Origanum marjorana), and chamomile. Such herbs and plants were scattered on the floor of homes and in monasteries, a far healthier option than the aroma of synthetic sprays which popularize the market today.

Trees and Witches’ Brooms

Brooms and their association with witches were prevalent during Medieval times; people did not always understand the complexity of plants and perhaps the notorious association with witches and their brooms was in part due to a certain disease that attacked specific tree species. According to a report, Witches’ Brooms on Trees, on the Iowa State University website, a tightly formed cluster of twigs that manifest on various woody plant species and conifers such as pine, maple and willow that occur due to environmental stresses, genetic mutations and other unknown factors, are commonly called witches’ brooms, as they resemble the shape and look of a traditional broom. Witches were often blamed in Medieval times for unexplainable occurrences such as this. Witches’ broom formations were ideal as broom making material too.

Learn More About Using Aromatic Plants with Sedona Aromatherapie

If you would like to learn more about aromatic plants, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM Program.

References:

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Aromatherapy Blends for Managing Fibromyalgia

Posted on: October 2nd, 2017 by
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Aromatherapy Blends for Fibromyalgia Pain

Aromatherapy Blends for Fibromyalgia Pain

This week’s post comes from the heart, as it is based on my personal experience. Earlier this year, I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, a condition that many (predominately women) “live” with, but for which there is “no cure.” Each case of fibromyalgia is different, and symptoms vary from sufferer to sufferer; what works for one person (change in diet, exercise etc) may not work for another. So, this post is written as an educational post only, based on my own experiences, but in the hope that some of these blends may help a fellow sufferer. However, it is important that you assess your own individual circumstances and speak to your healthcare provider before implementing any of the suggestions mentioned below.

Common Symptoms of Fibromyalgia

Two of the most common symptoms associated with fibromyalgia are chronic pain and fatigue; not just any type of fatigue, as in “sleep for a couple of hours and you’ll feel better,” but an exhaustion that is not relieved by rest or any amount of sleep. There are also all sorts of other symptoms that fibromyalgia sufferers experience, ranging from IBS, UTI infections, and haemorrhoids, to extreme sensitivity to temperature changes, ranging from very hot to very cold. You may also experience dry skin patches, the emergence of red and itchy rashes out-of-the-blue and, if like me you are also at risk of lupus (or have lupus), you maybe taking medication that supresses your immune system (beacause my immune system is hyper-active and is, basically, off the charts). Consequently, this makes you more at risk of infection and disease if you get a cut on your finger or are exposed to cold and flu.

Again, this is my personal experience, and other fibromyalgia sufferers may experience the same or different symptoms. I mention these symptoms as the aromatherapy blends which follow address these particular symptoms.

Pain Relief Aromatherapy Blend for Fibromyalgia

One of my most beneficial aromatherapy blends for managing the pain associated with fibromyalgia, along with prescribed medication, is this simple blend:

  • 1 oz apricot (Prunus armenica) oil

  • 4 drops Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) essential oil

  • 1 drop frankincense (Boswellia carteri) essential oil

  • 1 drop lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oil

Combine all of the ingredients together in a suitable bottle and apply to the area of pain as needed (for external use on the skin only).

Aromatherapy Blends to Cool and Heal in Managing Fibromyalgia Symptoms

Fibromyalgia sufferers sometimes experience “hot flashes,” or an intense feeling of heat (right down to the joints). Although the application of an ice pack may help to alleviate some of the heat, I find that a cold compress with peppermint (Mentha x piperita) hydrosol often helps. Apply to the back of the neck for “hot flashes” or to the area which feel “hot” to you. Alternatively, spray a small amount of peppermint hydrosol to the back of the neck.

Hydrosols can also be used to heal and protect if you get a small cut on your hand. Spray a small amount of a hydrosol, such as helichrysum (Helichrysum angustifolia), onto a cotton pad and wipe gently over the cut to promote healing and to prevent scarring. Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) hydrosol can also be used as an anti-bacterial agent.

Aromatherapy Blend to Manage Haemorrhoids in Fibromyalgia

Haemorrhoids are painful, whatever the cause. The following blend is intended for external use only:

  • 2 oz unscented white lotion base*

  • 4 drops cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) essential oil

  • 8 drops juniper (Juniperus communis) essential oil

  • 6 drops frankincense (Boswellia carteri) essential oil

* a gel can also be used in place of the white lotion base. Both of these bases are “cooling” and are preferable to an oil base.

Cautions: Avoid use in pregnancy and/or with kidney disease.

Combine all of the ingredients together in a suitable bottle and apply to the area of the haemorrhoids as needed (for external use on the skin only).

Aromatherapy Blend for Insomnia in Fibromyalgia

Insomnia is another problem for fibromyalgia sufferers. This simple sleep spray may help you to fall asleep more easily:

  • 2 oz distilled water

  • 10 drops valerian (Valeriana officinalis) essential oil

  • 15 drops lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oil

Combine all of the ingredients together in a spray bottle and spray lightly on your pillow before going to sleep at night.

Learn More About Using Essential Oils with Sedona Aromatherapie

If you would like to learn how to use essential oils for specific conditions such as fibromyalgia, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM Program.

References:

  • The recommendations and views expressed in this article are based on the author’s personal experience of fibromyalgia and a 20 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens.

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Aromatic Blends with Safflower Oil

Posted on: September 25th, 2017 by
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Aromatic Blends with Safflower Oil

Aromatic Blends with Safflower Oil

In the final post of the trilogy on safflower, I am finishing up with two aromatic blends which incorporate safflower oil. Safflower may not be an oil that you will generally have in your aromatherapy carrier oil toolbox, but it is one which is worth considering if you are either looking to combine another oil with one such as sunflower oil, or indeed replace an oil high in linoleic acid – such as pumpkin seed, rosehip seed, and evening primrose oil.

Daily Skincare for Dry Skin with Safflower Oil

As discussed in the first post of this trilogy, safflower oil is recommended for use with dry skin and, if you’ve not had much success with regular skincare oils recommended for this condition, consider the use of safflower oil combined with the more affordable sunflower oil. Add appropriate essential oils such as lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) to enhance this blend. More information on essential oils for different skincare types is included in my book Authentic Aromatherapy.

For Adult Use Only.

You will need:

  • 1 part safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) oil

  • 3 parts sunflower (Helanthius annuus) oil

For example: For 1 oz of oil, you would combine 1/4 oz of safflower oil with 3/4 oz of sunflower oil.

Essential Oils:

  • 1.5 % lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

  • 0.5 % geranium (Pelargonium graveolens)

For example: For 1 oz of base oil, you would add 8 drops of lavender essential oil and 4 drops of geranium essential oil for a total of 12 drops (2% dilution rate).

Instructions for Use:

  • Combine all of the ingredients in a suitable bottle. I suggest a PET bottle with a flip cap if storing in the bathroom.

  • To apply: Add a small amount to hands and massage over body as needed up to a maximum of three times a day.

Luxury Blend of Skincare Oils with Linoleic Acid

If dry skin is a real problem for you, you may want to treat your skin to a luxury blend of some of the best carrier oils which are high in linoleic acid. I would not add essential oils to this blend, although if you would like to add some for the aroma, you can do so. Just follow the recommended guidelines or consult a certified aromatherapist.

You will need:

For example: For 1 oz of oil, you would mix together 1/4 oz of each oil.

Instructions for Use:

  • Combine all of the ingredients together in a suitable bottle. A PET bottle with a flip cap, or a glass bottle with a glass dropper for use are both acceptable.

  • To apply: Massage a small amount of the blend over the the skin. Use sparingly as these oils are both expensive and rich in their action.

Learn More About Using Carrier Oils with Sedona Aromatherapie

If you would like to learn how to use carrier oils further, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM Program.

References:

  • The recommendations expressed in this article are based on the author’s 20 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens.

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