Basic Aromatic Rose Blends for Summer

Posted on: June 5th, 2017 by
Comments Disabled
Aromatic Rose Blends for thr Bath

Aromatic Rose Blends for the Bath

In the final two posts of my current double rose trilogy on the blog, I am including six simple rose blends ideal for the summer months! Each blend requires minimum ingredients and has been blended with budget in mind. Enjoy!

Aromatic Rose Spray with Hydrosols and Essential Oils

Hydrosol sprays are great for the summer months to cool down, tone skin, or refresh. You can also use them to set the mood for a romantic dinner!

Here’s what you’ll need to create this particular aromatic rose summer spray:

  • 0.5 oz rose (Rosa x damascena) hydrosol

  • 0.5 oz melissa (Melissa officinalis) hydrosol

  • 1 oz geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) hydrosol

  • 3 drops palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii) essential oil

  • 2 drops lemongrass (Cymbogon citratus) essential oil

  • 1 drop amyris (Amyris balsamifera) essential oil

This is a 1% blend of essential oils in hydrosols, in order to maximize the subtle aroma of the hydrosols.

Instructions for Use:

  • Blend together the hydrosols and the essential oils in a 2 oz spray bottle. A solubol can be added if desired, or simply shake the bottle vigorously before each use.

  • Spray on self or around the room, remembering not to spray directly into eyes or other orifices. Take caution if using around babies and children, seniors, or in pregnancy.

Bonus Tip:

  • This blend contains essential oils and/or hydrosols that are used as insect repellents. A great summer blend to protect yourself and to enjoy a summer evening!

Aromatic Rose Bath Salts with Essential Oils

The following essential oil blend is one of my favorites for the bath as it utilizes three of my favorite salts, with a subtle rose twist to nourish the skin and relax after a long, hot day. For adult use only.

You will need:

  • 4 oz Epsom salts

  • 2 oz Dead Sea salts

  • 1 oz Himalyan Pink Salts (Fine)

  • 12 drops geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil

  • 4 drop rose (Rosa x damascena) essential oil

  • 8 drops mandarin (Citrus reticulata) essential oil

  • 1 oz borax or bicarbonate of soda (to combine the ingredients)

Instructions for Use:

  • Combine the essential oils, salts, and borax/bicarbonate of soda together in a 8 oz jar or container. Try to avoid the use of glass jars near the bath tub as they are in danger of breaking.

  • Add one to two tablespoons to the bath as required. Mix well.

Bonus Tip:

  • If you don’t have rose essential oil, simply replace the required amount with geranium essential oil.

Relaxing Rose Blend for Baby with Essential Oils

A basic, unscented white lotion makes a great base to use with baby. Carrier oils can be oily and slippy – not a great combination with a wriggling little one! Although I recommend hydrosols for use with babies and young children, this very basic lotion with rose essential oil is great to calm and relax baby before bed.

You will need:

  • 1 oz unscented white lotion

  • 1 drop of rose (Rosa x damascena) essential oil

Instructions for Use:

  • Add the rose essential oil to the white lotion base and mix well. Store in a suitable jar or container. A PET bottle with a flip top is ideal to use around baby.

  • Apply gently to baby’s skin before bed to relax. If any irritation occurs, stop use immediately and consult a qualified health care professional.

Bonus Tip:

  • It is extremely important to use the best quality essential oils for baby. If you don’t have rose essential oil, substitute with geranium essential oil.

Learn More About Safe Essential Oil Use with Sedona Aromatherapie

If you would like to learn how to use essential oils and other aromatic plant extracts safely, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM Program.

References:

  • The recommendations expressed in this article are based on the author’s 20 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry, as a UK-certified aromatherapist, as a published author in aromatherapy, as an approved education provider for the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), as an aromatherapy business owner, as a consultant, and as Chief Editor for the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal.

Pin It

Related Posts:


Rose: A Divine and Feminine Essence

Posted on: May 29th, 2017 by
Comments Disabled
Rose as a feminine and divine essence

Rose as a feminine and divine essence

Today’s post continues the series on rose but it is perhaps a slight deviation from the usual type of posts that I write. However, I thought that it was both interesting, and relevant, to take a brief look at what rose means as a feminine essence, and the divinity attached to it throughout the centuries. How does that apply to rose as an essence, an aromatic to be used in therapeutic and perfume blends? Well, here’s my interpretation of that concept!

Symbolism of Rose Throughout the Centuries

There is no doubt that rose has been a sacred and divine symbol for many different cultures throughout the centuries. Think about how rose was incoporated into the church; its exuberant use by lovers such as Cleopatra and Marc Antony, and Napoleon and Josephine; and the decandance use of rose by the Romans who threw lavish parties with rose petals.

Rose has symbolized love, purity, Greek goddesses, and sisterhood – and therein lies the common thread, the feminine. Rose is often called the Queen of the Flowers, its flower petals and aroma as soft as a woman’s touch.

The Heart of Rose

In perfumery and aromatherapy, rose is regarded as a base note oil and aroma, or a soul note. To me, rose can cross that divide between a middle note, or heart note, and a soul note, depending upon the extract and exact rose species. Rose is both the heart and soul of a blend; after all, rose has a long association with matters of the heart – love – which also affect the soul, hence the term soul mate.

We often talk about following your heart’s desire, or in other words, connecting with your true life purpose. This can also be described as the feminine or divine essence, truly connecting with the Earth, its gifts, and each other.

The Creativeness of Rose

Why chose rose as the flower and aroma to connect to this divine essence? Rose parallels a lot of characteristics associated with the feminine essence and the female form. For instance, rose petals are soft, colorful, and aromatic (sometimes) but there is also the thorny, protective side of rose. Many women can also identify with these characteristics, and it should not be something we run or hide from, but embrace in all of its imperfectiveness.

Rose as an aroma is made up of so many complex components that not all of them have yet been identified. We are talking hundreds of different, subtle chemical components that give each rose its fragrance. Imagine blending, and creating, with all of these subtle changes! Not only does it inspire creativity in the aromatherapist and perfumer, but also the artist, the flower grower, the florist, the gardener, just YOU – all can tap into the creativity that this complex aroma presents.

Aromatic Blending with Rose

Rose is a versatile therapeutic aroma; it is used in all types of skincare products for different skin issues; it is used for stress, depression, and anxiety; it aids in sleep and with headaches; and it addresses many problems that women encounter through their life cycle. It’s gentle enough to be used with babies and children and may help to increase confidence and reduce jealousy in little ones. To me, it is a nuturing and protective oil, another parallel with the feminine.

From an aromatherapist’s and perfumer’s point of view, the aroma of rose can be found not just in rose itself, but in other plants and fragrances, too. Examine the different layers that each plant and/or oil presents, and you will discover that rose exists in many forms. In my opinion, blending with rose can help you to grow as an aromatic formulator and it may help you to truly tap into your divine feminine!

Learn More About Rose with Sedona Aromatherapie

I will conclude this double rose trilogy with a double post of rose aromatic recipes, over the next two weeks, to demonstrate the topic discussed in this post. In addition, don’t forget to check out the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM Program.

References:

  • The views expressed in this article belong to the author but the author is a 20 year veteran in the health care and aromatherapy industry, a UK-certified aromatherapist, published author in aromatherapy, an approved education provider for the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), an aromatherapy business owner, a consultant, and Chief Editor for the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal.

Pin It

Related Posts:


Different Types of Rose Extractions

Posted on: May 22nd, 2017 by
Comments Disabled

Extractions of Rose: Photo Copyright Sharon Falsetto, All Rights ReservedContinuing my series of blog posts on rose, this week I am looking at the myriad of options available for using rose as an extraction – as an oil, absolute, hydrosol, and other type of extract. Each different medium produced, in addition to the method of extraction, region the plant is grown in, and other environmental factors, will affect the final aroma of your product. Rose is not the only plant affected this way, but it is an interesting plant to study because of the complexity of its chemical make-up. Here’s a brief introduction to different types of rose extractions!

Rose as an Essential Oil

Given the amount of plant material required to extract rose as an essential oil, the resulting oil is expensive, but pure. In addition, the essential oil will vary in its aroma depending upon which species of rose it is extracted from. Two of the most common species of rose extracted for essential oil include:

  • rose otto (Rosa x damascena)
  • cabbage rose or Rose de Mai (Rosa x centifolia).

Rose essential oil is extracted by steam or water distillation of the fragile rose petals.

Rose as Absolute

Rose can also be extracted by solvent extraction, resulting in an absolute. The same species of rose are used for solvent extraction as for essential oil distillation, but the differing method will result in a different aroma. Perfumers may seek these subtle differences in the rose aroma, but an aromatherapist may wish to use only rose essential oil in their practice; solvent extracted rose retains chemicals used in the extraction process, thus affecting potential therapeutic properties, although it doesn’t adversely affect aroma.

Rose as a Hydrosol

Rose can also be distilled to produce a hydrosol. A hydrosol is a “water-based” product that is steam or water distilled in much the same way as the essential oil – except that the water, and not the oil, is drawn off and used. Rose hydrosol will retain a “less heavy” aroma than the essential oil and also contains therapeutic properties for use in aromatherapy; these include uses in skincare, for many “women’s problems,” and for use with babies and children, as a “gentler” alternative to rose essential oil.

Rose as an Infused Oil

You can also infuse rose petals in a vegetable oil, such as sunflower or grapeseed, and use the resulting oil therapeutically – or in an oil-base perfume. This is a slow, but traditional, method for extracting rose’s scent and therapeutic properties. The infused oil will not act in exactly the same way as the essential oil, but it is a less costly alternative.

Learn how to infuse an oil in this post.

Other Types of Rose Extracts: Concrètes, Organic Extracts, and CO2 Extraction

You may also have heard of a rose extraction called concrète. Concrète is created from immersing rose petals in a solvent. Once the solvent evaporates, the solid, waxy residue, the concrète, can be used in perfumery applications. The concrète is the starting point from which the absolute is made.

An organic extract, similar to an absolute, can also be made from rose petals, in much the same way as the absolute is made, but using an organic solvent, therefore rendering it an organic extract vs. an absolute.

A relative newcomer to the market is the CO2 extract. CO2 extraction uses carbon dioxide, utilizing different pressure and temperature, to create a more “clean” oil which more closely resembles the chemical make-up of the plant.

The aroma of each of these types of extracts will vary.

Learn More About Rose with Sedona Aromatherapie

Rose is a complex aromatic with hundreds of different components which go into its creation; some of these components still remain elusive and have yet to be identified. Start your studies of this fascinating aromatic with the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of Aromatics(TM) Program!

References:

  • Author’s own research.
  • Author is a 20 year veteran in the health care and aromatherapy industry, a UK-certified aromatherapist, published author in aromatherapy, an approved education provider for the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), an aromatherapy business owner, a consultant, and Chief Editor for the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal.
Pin It

Related Posts:


Rose Hip Carrier Oil for Aromatherapy Blends

Posted on: May 15th, 2017 by
Comments Disabled
Rosehip is used as a carrier oil in aromatherapy

Rosehip is used as a carrier oil in aromatherapy

Rose hip oil, also known as rose hip seed oil, is extracted from the seeds of a wild rose bush of the Rosa species. It should not be confused with other types of “rose oil,” including rose essential oil, rose absolute, and rose-infused oil. It is used in aromatherapy practice as a healing carrier oil and you will find it in many skincare blends, too. Here’s a closer look at rose hip oil!

Rose Hip as a Plant

Rose hip is a member of the Rosaceae plant family. It is native to the Andes region of South America, particularly in Peru and Chile, and it has historically been used by South American native people for its therapeutic properties.

The rose hip is a species of wild rose bush which grows to a height of eight feet. The bush has white and pink flowers with fruits of red berry – called rose hips. The presence of carotenoids give the rose hips their bright red color. This particular rose bush goes by several botanical names including Rosa canina, Rosa rubiginosa, Rosa acularis, and Rosa rugosa, in reference to its various characteristics.1 Close species of the plant grow within a short distance of each other, resulting in extractions from various plant species.

Traditional Extraction of Rose Hip Oil

Rose hip oil is extracted from the rose hips traditionally through cold expression; cold pressed oils retain many of the properties which the plant possesses. Rose hip oil is golden red in color, due to the carotenoids present in the original rose hips.

More recently, CO2 extraction has made rosehip seed oil available in a different format. CO2 extracted rose hip oil is closer in comparison to the actual plant and retains a longer shelf life than the cold pressed carrier oil.2

Healing Properties of Rose Hip Oil

Rose hip seed oil has healing properties because of the presence of trans-retinoic acid in rose hip oil. In addition, it has a higher content of vitamin C than oranges. Rose hip oil is anti-inflammatory, moisturizing and it is possibly diuretic (although there are conflicting studies on this). Rose hip oil is particularly useful in skin care; rose hip oil can be used to:

  • heal burns

  • ease eczema

  • heal wounds

  • heal scars

  • reduce wrinkles (which is why it is popular in skin care creams and lotions)

  • treat sun damaged skin

  • hydrate and nourish skin.

Rose hip seed oil is recommended for use in skincare for mature or dry skin. It is easily absorbed into the skin. It is not traditionally recommended for use with oily skin.3

Other Uses of Rose Hip

Historically, rose hips have had several culinary uses; rose hip fruits have been used in herbal teas, syrups and jams. In addition, rose hips were considered a “sweetmeat” in Medieval times.

Learn More About Aromatherapy with Sedona Aromatherapie

Consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program to learn more how rosehip carrier oil is used in aromatic practice!

References:

  1. Price, Len 1999 Carrier Oils For Aromatherapy and Massage UK: Riverhead

  2. Eden Botanicals website, OrganicRose Hip CO2, accessed May 15, 2017

  3. Mountain Rose Herbs website, Rosehip Seed Oil, accessed May 15, 2017

  • Author is a 20 year veteran in the health care and aromatherapy industry, a UK-certified aromatherapist, published author in aromatherapy, an approved education provider for the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), an aromatherapy business owner, a consultant, and Chief Editor for the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal.

Pin It

Related Posts:


An Introduction to Rose

Posted on: May 8th, 2017 by
Comments Disabled
Rose in the Garden: Photo Copyright Sharon Falsetto, All Rights Reserved

Rose in the Garden: Photo Copyright Sharon Falsetto, All Rights Reserved

Rose. A small, yet powerful, word, and plant. Rose has been adored by Kings and Queens, given in love by endless suitors, and examined by perfumers for years in an attempt to distinguish every single note that goes into making up its elusive aroma. Yet rose is not one flower – or one fragrance. It has many facets to its make-up – botanically, chemically, and aromatically.

Over the next six weeks, I will be looking at rose in not one, but two, trilogies. I will be looking at rose from a botanical aspect, an aromatherapist’s aspect, a perfumer’s aspect, and from a sacred, and spiritual, aspect, culminating in some great rose blends just prior to midsummer’s eve.

Join me on this beautiful journey to discover more about one of the planet’s greatest creations!

Introducing Rose as a Plant

The rose belongs to the Rosaceae plant family. The majority of roses have five petals; the exception to this rule is the Rosa sericea, a species of rose found predominately in China, Bhutan and India, which only has four petals. Beneath the petals are the same number of sepals. Cultivated roses usually have “clusters” of petals as oppose to wild roses which have single petals. Similarly, roses with aroma are usually single-headed roses, rather than double-headed roses, which have often been bred for their color vs. aroma.

Roses have pinnate leaves and prickles; the prickles of a rose are commonly referred to as thorns. The prickles of a rose are designed to allow the rose to attach itself to other vegetation, although some rose species have prickles which are designed to protect them from being eaten by animals.

Roses come in a variety of colors including red, pink, white, yellow and orange, although hybridization of roses has resulted in some unusual shades of rose colors. Contrary to popular belief, not all rose species are fragrant (see my note above on which types of roses are usually fragrant). Roses range in size from half an inch in flower diameter to seven inches in flower diameter.

The Fruit of a Rose: The Rose Hip

The fruit of a rose is referred to as a rose hip. A rose hip is shaped like a berry and it is produced by open-faced rose species which are pollinated by insects. However, many modern rose hybrids do not provide the facility for pollination due to their “closed” flowers.

Rose hips are, in general, red in color although some rose hips may be black or dark purple. Rose hips have many medicinal and culinary uses including as a source of vitamin C, use in aromatherapy, use in wine, use in jams, and as a herbal tea.

Types of Roses

There are approximately 100 species of roses, which are generally classified into several major categories (with thousands of varieties within the classes). In addition to wild roses, garden roses are usually classified as follows:

  • old garden roses – includes china, tea, R.alba, R.centifolia, R.damascena, R.gallica, moss, bourbon and noisette roses

  • modern garden roses – includes hybrid tea, R.grandiflora, R.floribunda, polyantha, miniature and pernetiana roses

  • climbing roses

  • landscape roses.

The Extraction of Rose

Rose essential oil, for therapeutic and perfumery purposes, is traditionally produced by two major species of roses – R.centifolia and R.damascena. However, today, you may find extracts of rose produced from other scented varieties of rose. Rose is an expensive essential oil to produce as thousands of rose petals are needed to extract a minute quantity of pure rose essential oil; therefore, it might be frequently adulterated by suppliers. Rose essential oil is used in aromatherapy to aid depression, stress, insomnia, female reproductive problems, and in skin care.

Rose is also extracted via solvent and used as an absolute. In addition, it might be extracted to produce a hydrosol.

Learn More About Aromatherapy with Sedona Aromatherapie

Consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program to learn more how rose is used in aromatic practice!

References:

  • Encyclopedia Britannica web site, Rose, accessed May 8, 2017

  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils, Julia Lawless, UK: 1995

  • University of Illinois Extension Our Rose Garden web site, accessed May 8, 2017

  • Author is a 20 year veteran in the health care and aromatherapy industry, a UK-certified aromatherapist, published author in aromatherapy, an approved education provider for the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), an aromatherapy business owner, a consultant, and Chief Editor for the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal.

Pin It

Related Posts:


Three Aromatic Blends for Spring

Posted on: May 1st, 2017 by
Comments Disabled
Aromatic Blends for Spring: Photo Copyright Sharon Falsetto All Rights Reserved

Aromatic Blends for Spring: Photo Copyright Sharon Falsetto All Rights Reserved

In the conclusion of my trilogy of the Seeds of Spring, my final post is three simple aromatic blends for spring, based on a combination of my previous posts on dill and fennel, and seed carrier oils. Spring is a time of rejuvenation, spring cleaning, and connecting with the earth through new growth. These three simple spring aromatherapy blends attempt to incorporate these ideals.

Spring Cleaning Blend for the Soul and Home

Spring is traditionally the time to “clean house,” in an attempt to clear out the stagnant aromas of winter, closed up spaces, and dusty corners. The following blend is not a traditional spring cleaning blend for cleaning house, but a blend to clean out stagnant energies in the home, and also the body and soul.

You will need:

  • 0.5 oz rose hydrosol

  • 0.5 oz fennel hydrosol

  • 0.5 oz peppermint hydrosol

  • 0.5 oz melissa hydrosol

Instructions for Use: Simply combine all of the hydrosols in a 2 oz spray bottle. Spray liberally around the home, “cleaning” each room as you go. Open windows while you are doing this. Make sure that all pets, children, and vulnerable adults are removed before you do so. You can also spray this blend over and around yourself, closing your eyes while doing so.

Cautions: Do not use if use is contra-indicated as per aromatherapy guidelines for each hydrosol. Peppermint hydrosol should not be used on or around babies and children under three years of age. Fennel is contra-indicated for pregnancy and in epilepsy.

Moody Afternoon Diffuser Blend

Spring often brings much needed rain for the seeds in the garden to flourish and grow. A rainy day may mean an afternoon indoors, and the following diffuser blend may help to lift spirits and connect with the season.

You will need:

  • 30 drops vetiver essential oil

  • 25 drops lemon essential oil

  • 15 drops clary sage essential oil

  • 25 drops coriander (seed) essential oil

Instructions for Use: This blend makes approximately 4 ml of essential oil blend. Mix and pour the blend into an appropriate bottle with an orifice reducer. Add approximately 5 drops of the blend to an aromatherapy diffuser. Refer to the manufacturer’s guidelines for use.

Cautions: Avoid use in pregnancy.

Spring Rejuvenation Blend for the Skin

Skin is ready to come out and play again as spring arrives! However, you may not be quite ready to put your best foot forward if your skin has been hidden under winter layers for several months. Soothe winter skin with this moisturizing whipped butter and you will soon be spring ready!

You will need:

  • 4 oz whipped body butter base*

  • 20 drops fennel essential oil

  • 13 drops geranium essential oil

  • 15 drops sandalwood essential oil

*whipped body butter base: You can purchase a cosmetic base from a cosmetic body base supplier or make your-own as detailed in the Sedona Aromatherapie Certificate in Professional Aromatherapy course.

Instructions for Use: Blend all of the ingredients together and store in a 4 oz dispensing bottle. Apply liberally to the skin after bathing.

Cautions: Avoid use in pregnancy and with epilepsy.

Tip: If you are making your own base, consider adding borage carrier oil.

Learn More About Aromatherapy with Sedona Aromatherapie

Consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program to learn more about aromatherapy and aromatic practice!

References:

  • Author is a 20 year veteran in the health care and aromatherapy industry, a UK-certified aromatherapist, published author in aromatherapy, an approved education provider for the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), an aromatherapy business owner, a consultant, and Chief Editor for the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal.

Pin It

Related Posts: