The Difference Between Level One and Level Two Aromatherapy Certification (in the United States)

Posted on: September 29th, 2014 by
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Aromatherapy Certification: Photo Credit, ISP

Aromatherapy Certification: Photo Credit, ISP

In the United States (and many other countries) there is no legal requirement to become “certified” in aromatherapy before practicing the therapy. However, in order to recognize a certain level of aromatherapy education, professional aromatherapy organizations, such as the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA), require aromatherapy educators to meet certain standards. The main two standards of aromatherapy certification in the United States are level one and level two. Here’s a look at what each level of certification means.

Level One Aromatherapy Certification

The current NAHA guidelines for aromatherapy certification at level one require the student to be familiar with twenty essential oils. In addition, the student must understand aromatherapy history, the production and quality of essential oils, basic physiology of four anatomy and physiology systems of the body (as specified) – including how essential oils are absorbed by the body, how essential oils interact physically and emotionally, chemistry of essential oils, and how to create, and apply, an aromatherapy blend safely.

NAHA guidelines require the student to carry out thirty hours of study.

Note that although level one is a comprehensive introduction to aromatherapy, students who complete this level of certification do not qualify for professional membership of NAHA, are not fully equipped to practice as a fully-certified aromatherapist, cannot take the ARC examination to become a registered aromatherapist, and cannot usually obtain quality practitioner’s liability insurance at this level.

Level Two Aromatherapy Certification

The current NAHA guidelines for aromatherapy certification at level two require that the student is familiar with all of the information as stated for level one, in addition to the following information:

  • twenty five to thirty additional essential oils to level one

  • basic botany

  • properties of essential oils in a holistic framework

  • extraction methods

  • carrier oils

  • blending techniques

  • safety of aromatherapy

  • business development

  • aromatherapy consultation

  • legal and ethical issues

  • full anatomy and physiology of the body.

Level two requires the completion of a research paper, case histories, and a final examination. Level two must also provide a minimum of 200 hours study.

Successful completion of a level two approved course usually means that the student can become a professional member of an aromatherapy organization, can set up their own aromatherapy practice/business confidently, take the optional ARC examination (if so desired), and obtain professional practitioner’s liability insurance.

Sedona Aromatherapie Foundation Course in Aromatherapy

The Sedona Aromatherapie Foundation Course in Aromatherapy is a fifty hour home study course that has been approved by NAHA for level one. It meets and exceeds the requirements as specified by NAHA guidelines. For further information on this course, visit the relevant course page.

Sedona Aromatherapie Certification in Professional Aromatherapy

The Sedona Aromatherapie Certification in Professional Aromatherapy program is a 250 hour home study course that has been approved by NAHA for level two. It meets and exceeds the requirements as specified by NAHA guidelines. For further information on this course, visit the relevant course page.

In addition, Sedona Aromatherapie offers several other short aromatherapy, and bath and body courses, for the hobbyist, or those that don’t wish to pursue a certification level course.

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