How to Infuse Peppermint in a Vegetable Oil

Posted on: August 11th, 2014 by
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Peppermint Infusion: Photo copyright, Sharon Falsetto

Peppermint Infusion: Photo copyright, Sharon Falsetto

In a previous blog post I wrote about infusing jasmine in a carrier oil. A couple of weeks ago, I decided to infuse peppermint leaves (Mentha piperita) into a vegetable oil. I decided to then use the peppermint-infused carrier oil in a recipe for aromatherapy melts. I received the peppermint leaves for the infusion by way of a neighbor so I knew that the plant material was freshly grown! In this week’s post, I’ll discuss how I actually infused the peppermint leaves into the vegetable oil, and next week I will discuss what I actually did with the infused oil. Enjoy!

What You Will Need for a Plant Infusion

In my book, Authentic Aromatherapy, I describe how to make an infused oil. Basically, you will need the following items to make a plant infusion:

  • a container for the infusion (such as a Mason jar)

  • vegetable carrier oil

  • plant material

  • a sieve

  • sunshine – lots of it!

Preparing Peppermint Leaves for an Infusion

I decided to infuse peppermint leaves for this particular infusion in apricot kernel (Prunus armeniaca) oil. I dried the peppermint leaves out for a day or so first to avoid any water moisture “contaminating” the infusion. Personally, I found this worked better for me than previous infusions where I had not let the material dry out first. The process is different to making an essential oil or hydrosol.

I dried out the peppermint leaves by lying them on a sheet of clean tissue paper and leaving them for forty-eight hours. As I live in a dry climate, I found that this worked well; if you live in a damp or humid climate, you might need to take a different approach.

The Process of Infusing Peppermint Leaves in Carrier Oil

After the peppermint leaves were dry, I separated them from the stalk and placed them in a Mason jar. I filled the Mason jar with apricot kernel oil and placed the jar in the sun. For the next two weeks, I put the jar outside in the sun during daylight hours. Sunshine is easy to come by in Arizona, so this process worked very easily for me!

From time to time, I checked on the infusion to see how it was doing. It began to take on a peppermint aroma after a few days. After two weeks, I separated the peppermint leaves from the oil using a kitchen sieve. The oil changed to a slightly green color with a peppermint aroma. I bottled the oil that I was not going to use to make the aromatherapy melts, in order to store it for a future project.

Next week I will discuss how I used the peppermint-infused apricot oil in a recipe for aromatherapy melts.

Learn How to Make Aromatherapy Products with Sedona Aromatherapie

If you would like to make a variety of different aromatherapy products with a simple home study course, consider one of the Sedona Aromatherapie product making courses. To learn more, visit the courses home page.

Peppermint Leaves for Infusion; Photo copyright Sharon Falsetto

Peppermint Leaves for Infusion; Photo copyright Sharon Falsetto

Dried Peppermint Leaves: Photo copyright, Sharon Falsetto

Dried Peppermint Leaves: Photo copyright, Sharon Falsetto

 

Peppermint-infused Vegetable Oil: Photo copyright, Sharon Falsetto

Peppermint-infused Vegetable Oil: Photo copyright, Sharon Falsetto

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