Companion Aromatic Plants Which Help Each Other

Posted on: February 4th, 2013 by
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Essential oils and plants, istockphoto, used with permission

Essential oils and plants, istockphoto, used with permission

We all need a helping hand once in a while in life – and its no different in the world of plants! There are several aromatic plant species which help protect others from the dangers which surround them. Some plants have their own aromatic defense systems too but in this post we will look at those plants which help each other out.

Types of Aromatic Plants Which Act as Companion Plants

Plant species which are good companions to other plants include:

  • sage(Salvia officinalis) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) as companions to vegetable plants

  • yarrow (Achillea millefolium) as a companion to many medicinal plants and herbs as it increases the aromatic quality of such plants

  • hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) helps to protect plants from bacterial invasion

  • chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) helps sick plants recover.

Using Essential Oils as an Alternative to Companion Plants

If you don’t have the means or space to grow companion plants alongside other plants, you can also use essential oils as an alternative; here are a few suggestions for use:

  • hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) for roses

  • lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) for grapes, beans and apples

  • thyme (Thymus vulgaris) for broccoli

  • geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) for celery and peas.

Tips for Using Essential Oils for Plants

Remember to dilute the essential oil in water; you don’t need much. Valerie Ann Worwood, in The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy, recommends 3 drops of essential oil to a gallon of water in a pail; half this amount if you are using a spray. I know from experience, that less is more, otherwise you might end up doing more harm than good to the plant in question!

Aromatherapy Courses

The subject of botany and aromatic plants is introduced in the Sedona Aromatherapie Foundation Course in Aromatherapyand will be covered in greater depth in the Sedona Aromatherapie Aromatherapy Practitioner Course in 2013. To learn more about Sedona Aromatherapie courses, visit the courses home page.

References

  • Worwood, Valerie Ann, 1991, The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy USA: New World Library

  • Lawless, Julia, 1995, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils UK: Thorsons

  • Author’s own experience

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