Three Aromatic Forest Bathing Blends

Posted on: February 19th, 2018 by
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Aromatic Forest Bathing Blends

Aromatic Forest Bathing Blends

In my final post in the trilogy on forest bathing and how it relates to aromatherapy, I am giving you three aromatic forest bathing blends, incorporating the aromatic oils we discussed in the last post and the aromatic benefits that we discussed in the first post in this series. Enjoy!

Aromatic Forest Bathing Diffusion Blend

This blend can be adapted for an inhaler or an aromatherapy diffuser. Therefore I am giving the amounts as percentages so that you can convert to the appropriate dilution rate (1%, 2%, or more under guidance from a certified aromatherapist) for the product. If you need further advice on how to do this, consult a certified aromatherapist.

  • 30% Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) essential oil

  • 50% cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) essential oil

  • 10% myrrh (Commiphora myrrha) essential oil

  • 10% sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) essential oil

Directions for Use: Add the blend to an aromatherapy diffuser, following the manufacturer’s guidelines – or add to a personal inhaler. If using a diffuser, use in a well ventilated area.

Cautions: Avoid use in pregnancy.

Aromatic Forest Bathing Bath Blend

How about actual forest bathing with aromatic oils? Add this aromatic forest bath blend to the tub, close your eyes, and think of the forest! This blend is approximately 1% dilution.

You will need:

  • 8 oz. unscented bubble bath base

Essential Oils:

  • 20 drops cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)

  • 10 drops rose (Rosa x damscena)

  • 15 drops cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica)

Directions for Use: Combine the essential oil blend with the bubble bath base, preferably in a PET bottle for ease and safety of use in the bathroom. Add a small amount of the product to the bath under warm, running water. Relax and enjoy!

Cautions: Possible skin sensitivity in some individuals.

Aromatic Forest Bathing Hydrosol Blend

A combination of hydrosols in a spray bottle can be used to bring the aromatic forest into your home. Simply spray and enjoy!

You will need:

  • 1 oz. Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) hydrosol

  • 1 oz. Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) hydrosol

  • 2 oz. cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) hydrosol

Directions for Use: Combine the hydrosols together in a spray bottle. Spray lightly in the required areas of your home.

Cautions: Avoid spraying in areas where pets and children frequent. Make sure the area is well ventilated. Do not spray in eyes.

Learn About Aromatherapy with Sedona Aromatherapie

To learn more about how aromatherapy blends are used in aromatherapy practice, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program!

  • The author of this article has a 23 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She has taken the online Master Gardener short course series with the University of Oregon. Sharon works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens.

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Aromatic Oils for Forest Bathing

Posted on: February 12th, 2018 by
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Aromatic Oils for Forest Bathing

Aromatic Oils for Forest Bathing

In my last post on The Aromatic Benefits of Forest Bathing, we briefly looked at some common chemical components associated with essential oils and trees in relation to forest bathing. In this post we will look a little closer at some of those essential oils before culminating in some forest bathing blends in the final post of this trilogy.

Cypress Essential Oil

Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) is a member of the Cupressaceae botanical family. The species name, sempervirens, translates to evergreen or always alive. Cypress trees can be spotted on many a Mediterranean landscape, most notably those of Italy. A tall, conical tree, the essential oil extracted from its evergreen foliage is woody, and earthy, with a hint of spice.

Use cypress essential oil for respiratory issues, as an air freshner, and to calm the nerves.

Scotch Pine Essential Oil

Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a member of the Pinaceae botanical family. Pine trees are an impressive species, living for hundreds of years. Pine forests can be found right across Europe and Asia, although today you will also find pine trees in the United States. Another evergreen tree, Scotch pine is a tall, imposing tree with familiar long, green needles; the needles are distilled to produce the essential oil. Scotch pine essential oil has a strong, dry, balsamic aroma.

Use scotch pine esential oil for respiratory issues, nervous exhaustion, and as an air freshner or cleaning agent.

Fir Essential Oil

Fir is a broad name used to describe such essential oils such as balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and silver fir (Abies alba), both of which are members of the Pinaceae botanical family. Balsam fir is a tall, evergreen tree found in forests across North America whereas silver fir is a small tree which is indigenous to the mountains of northern Europe. Silver fir takes its name from its silver, white bark.

Balsam fir produces an essential oil from the distillation of the oleoresin collected from the tree bark; silver fir’s essential oil is steam distilled from the needles of the tree. Balsam fir essential oil has a balsamin, piney scent. Silver fir essential oil has a similar aroma but without the pine scent and it is richer in balsam. Both essential oils can be used for respiratory issues but balsam fir essential oil is favored particularly for use with depression, stress, and to ground.

Atlas Cedarwood Essential Oil

Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica) is also a member of the Pinaceae botanical family. A very tall, evergreen tree, shaped like a pyramid, Atlas cedarwood is native to the Atlas mountains of Morocco and Algeria (note that there are other species of “cedarwood,” too). The bark of Atlas cedarwood is extremely aromatic and it is distilled for use as an essential oil – which is warm, woody, and camphoraceous in aroma.

Use cedarwood essential oil for respiratory issues and as an air freshner. It is also an excellent grounding oil.

Beneficial Essential Oils to Combine With

Combine any of the above mentioned essential oils with:

  • monoterpene-rich oils such as citrus

  • sesquiterpene-rich oils such as ginger (Zingiber officinale), myrrh (Commiphora myrrha), and patchouli (Pogostemon cablin)

  • base note oils such as sandalwood(Santalum album) and rose (Rosa x damascena).

Study Aromatherapy with Sedona Aromatherapie

To learn more about how aromatherapy blends are used in aromatherapy practice, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program!

References

  • The author of this article has a combined 23 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She has taken the online Master Gardener short course series with the University of Oregon. Sharon works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the final stages of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead-in-progress, including an eighth of an acre of aromatic gardens.

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Aromatic Blends for February

Posted on: February 7th, 2018 by
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Aromatic Blends for February

Aromatic Blends for February

Welcome to February! Each month throughout 2018, I will be giving you three blends (one each for physical, emotional, and spiritual issues), based upon the season and/or month. I hope that it will introduce newcomers to the world of aromatherapy to purse more aromatherapy studies, and for those who already have an interest in aromatherapy, I hope that it encourages you to learn more! Happy blending!

Love-in-a-Haze Aromatherapy Blend

Emotional.

February: The month for lovers! But don’t forget to love yourself this month, too! The following blend is designed to stimulate a little bit of self-love when you are feeling low this month. Simply mist yourself and breathe in those loving aromas! This blend contains a mix of hydrosols to provide a lighter scent.

Hydrosols Chosen: Rose for love; geranium to encourage the release of feminine energy; clary sage to banish moodiness.

  • 1 oz rose (Rosa x damascena) hydrosol

  • 0.5 oz geranium(Pelargonium graveolens) hydrosol

  • 0.5 oz clary sage (Salvia sclarea) hydrosol

How to Use:

Combine all three hydrosols together in a 2 oz bottle with a spray fitting. Use as required.

Cautions for Use:

For adult use only.

New Moon Awakening Aromatherapy Blend

Spiritual.

Following January’s super blue blood moon, capture the energy of the approaching new moon in February with this spiritual awakening diffusion blend. This is a blend for contemplation, reflection, and planning. This recipe makes approximately 3 ml of blend.

Essential Oils Chosen: Bergamot to carry forward plans; vetiver for reflection; neroli for contemplation.

  • 30 drops vetiver (Vetiveria zizaniodes) essential oil

  • 20 drops neroli (Citrus aurantium var. amara (flos)) essential oil

  • 45 drops bergamot (Citrus bergamia) essential oil

How to Use:

Mix the essential oils together in a glass bottle with an orifice reducer. Add between 5 and 10 drops to a suitable aromatherapy diffuser. Consult the manufacturer’s guidelines for use.

Cautions for Use:

Avoid diffusing around those who are pregnant, young children and babies, and pets. Diffuse in a well-ventilated space.

Stiff Joint Reliever Aromatherapy Blend

Physical.

Winter can leave us with aching bones and joints which need relief before spring arrives. This custom massage blend can be used daily throughout the month of February to relieve stiff joints, as part of an overall health plan. This is a 2% dilution blend; decrease to a 1% dilution blend for those over 65 years of age.

Essential Oils Chosen: Roman chamomile for muscle and joint pain; cypress for poor circulation and muscle cramps; lavender for all-round relief.

Carrier Oils Chosen: Apricot kernel for pain relief; hazelnut for circulation; sunflower for moisturizing.

  • 1 oz sunflower(Helianthus annuum) oil

  • 0.75 oz apricot kernel (Prunus armeniaca) oil

  • 0.25 oz hazelnut (Corylus avellana) oil

  • 6 drops Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) essential oil

  • 8 drops cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) essential oil

  • 10 drops lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oil

How to Use:

Blend together the carrier oils in a mixing bowl. Add in the essential oils. Stir together. Pour into a 2 oz PET bottle. Cap and shake well. Apply to affected joints daily.

Cautions for Use:

Stop use if sensitivity occurs.

The Study of Aromatherapy

To learn more about how aromatherapy blends are used in aromatherapy practice, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program!

  • The author of this article has a 20 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She has taken the online Master Gardener short course series with the University of Oregon. Sharon works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens. 
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The Aromatic Benefits of Forest Bathing

Posted on: January 29th, 2018 by
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The Aromatic Benefits of Forest Bathing

The Aromatic Benefits of Forest Bathing

You may have heard the term forest bathing bandied around and wondered what exactly does this mean? Upon more research into the area of forest bathing, I discovered that we, as aromatherapists, have probably been carrying out the practice subconsciously for years, and our ancestors most certainly did it without much thought! Here’s a little bit more information on this practice, how it benefits our health, and how it connects to aromatherapy.

What is Forest Bathing?

Forest bathing is exactly what it sounds like: Bathing in forests. That is, not literally bathing as you do in taking a bath at home, but walking amongst the trees within the forest, breathing in the air, and “bathing” in the benefits of your surroundings.

Japanese medicine has taken a particular interest in the benefits of forest bathing, and there are now several studies on the effects on health from the practice.1 The ritual has now been incorporated into Japanese health care. In Japan, forest bathing is called Shinrin-yoku and the practice started in the 1980s.2

Aromatic Chemical Components Associated with Forests

Before scientific studies began to examine the benefits of forest bathing, people have, for centuries, known that nature helps to heal the human pysche. Many plants and trees release aromatic molecules into the air, prompting a “feel good” factor. For example, consider the main chemical components of the following trees which may influence3 someone practicing forest bathing:

  • Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) – one of the main chemical components to be found in the essential oil of pine is the monoterpene of pinene. Pine trees contain essential oil in their needles which evaporates within a forest and creates a healing environment.3

  • cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) – also contains a high dominance of monoterpene chemcial components, especially pinene.

  • Atlas cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica) – the main chemical component group to be found in the essential oil of Atlas cedarwood is sesquiterpene.

  • fir (Abies spp.) – contain the monoterpene chemical component group, including that of pinene.

Monoterpene and sesquiterpene chemical components are considered to be of particular benefit to the respiratory system, the nervous system, and the circulatory and immune systems.

Aromatic Benefits of Forest Bathing

Taking into consideration the above information, we can see that forest bathing has the potential to help with:

  • heart issues

  • stress and anxiety

  • respiratory problems

  • immune system disorders.

Indeed, forest bathing has been known to help with:

  • lowering blood pressure

  • boosting the functions of the immune system

  • lowering anxiety and stress levels

  • elevating mood and focus levels

  • better sleep.1

For those unable to experience forest bathing firsthand, aromatic blends may help. We will be looking at which essential oils may help as an alternative to forest bathing in the next article, followed by some suggested aromatic blends in the final article in this series.

The Study of Aromatherapy

To learn more about how aromatherapy blends are used in aromatherapy practice, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program!

References:

  1. NCBI website, Shrinrin-yoku (Forest Bathing) and Nature Therapy: A State-of-the-Art Review, accessed from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5580555/

  2. Shrinrin-yoku website, Shrinrin-yoku, accessed from: http://www.shinrin-yoku.org/shinrin-yoku.html

  3. Author’s own opinion based on her practice of aromatherapy and knowledge of chemical components found within these plants with regard to essential oil extraction.

  4. Caddy, Rosemary, 1997, Essential Oils in Colour, UK: Amberwood Publishing Ltd.

  • The author of this article has a combined 23 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She has taken the online Master Gardener short course series with the University of Oregon. Sharon works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the final stages of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead-in-progress, including an eighth of an acre of aromatic gardens.

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Beginner’s Aromatherapy: Certificate in Holistic Aromatherapy

Posted on: January 17th, 2018 by
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Cornflower is studied on the Certificate in Holistic Aromatherapy: Photo Copyright Sharon Falsetto All Rights Reserved

Cornflower is studied on the Certificate in Holistic Aromatherapy: Photo Copyright Sharon Falsetto All Rights Reserved

We are excited to announce that Sedona Aromatherapie has just launched a comprehensive new course for beginners to aromatherapy who want a solid education in aromatherapy, but who do not necessarily want to take the full length Certificate in Professional Aromatherapy. This new course is designed to empower aromatherapy users at home to safely and effectively use aromatherapy, and to give a good foundation to those who are thinking about starting an aromatherapy business but who have no experience in the subject area. Here’s some more information!

How the Aromatherapy Course is Set Up

No prior experience is needed to start this course. The course is divided into eight modules with a total of thirty lessons. At the end of each lesson, there is a table or short answer question to complete. At the end of each module, there is a practical project to complete. As this is an introductory course, there are no essays or reading assignments to complete like there is for the Certificate in Professional Aromatherapy. The aim of this course is to make learning fun – but obtain a comprehensive education in aromatherapy while doing so!

If you want to obtain the certificate in order to meet the requirements of NAHA Level 1 Certified Aromatherapist®, you will also need to complete Module Nine. This is an assessment module which requires the successful completion of five case studies (over a minimum period of three months), a five to ten page research paper on aromatherapy, and a multi-choice exam.

Aromatherapy Products that you will Make During the Course

You will learn to make the following aromatic products during this beginner’s course in aromatherapy:

  • aromatherapy sprays

  • aromatherapy oils

  • aromatherapy scrubs

  • aromatherapy salts

  • infused aromatic oils

  • aromatherapy inhalers

  • aromatherapy compresses.

Unique Selling Points about the Certificate in Holistic Aromatherapy

This is one of the few comprehensive foundation courses in aromatherapy on the market available, without having to take a full aromatherapy certification to level 2. On the successful completion of this course, you will:

  • be able to apply for NAHA level Certified Aromatherapist® membership.

  • Be proficient in making seven different types of aromatherapy products.

  • Be able to competently assess and choose essential oils/carrier oils/hydrosols to make a suitable aromatherapy blend.

  • Understand where, how, and why aromatic plants are extracted to produce aromatic oils and waters.

  • Understand the basic chemistry of essential oils.

  • Understand how to use essential oils safely.

  • Understand different dilution rates for different groups of people.

  • Understand labeling and language used for aromatherapy products.

  • Understand the scope of practice of an aromatherapist.

You will have the necessary skills to begin to use aromatic plants at home for your your health and well-being.

Learn More About the Certificate in Holistic Aromatherapy

This is a home study course so it can be studied from anywhere in the world. To learn more about this course, the support offered with it, pricing plans, and options, visit the Certificate in Holistic Aromatherapy web page!

About the Author and Course Provider:

The author of this article has a 23 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist®. She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She has taken the online Master Gardener short course series with the University of Oregon. Sharon works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens.

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Aromatic Blends for January

Posted on: January 2nd, 2018 by
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Aromatherapy Blends for Winter Blues

Aromatherapy Blends for Winter Blues

Welcome to a new year! Each month throughout 2018, I will be giving you three blends (one each for physical, emotional, and spiritual issues), based upon the season and/or month. I hope that it will introduce newcomers to the world of aromatherapy to pursue more aromatherapy studies, and for those who already have an interest in aromatherapy, I hope that it encourages you to learn more! Happy blending!

Winter Blues Aromatherapy Blend

The Holidays are over and we can often enter the month of January stressed out from the festive season, and facing the prospect of a “dark” month, in more ways than one, before spring dawns again. It’s easy to get depressed, or just down right “blue” at this time of year. Here’s a little pick-me-up to be enjoyed in a warming, winter bath. Use just a 1% dilution to avoid any possible skin sensitivity.

Essential Oils Chosen: Ylang ylang for depression, stress, and insomnia; geranium for anxiety and balance; vetiver for calming.

  • 8 oz Epsom salts

  • 15 drops ylang ylang (Cananga odorata) essential oil

  • 23 drops geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil

  • 10 drops vetiver (Vetiveria zizaniodes) essential oil

    optional: 1 teaspoon solubol-dispersant such as this one.

How to Use:

Mix all of the ingredients together in a suitable container. Add one to two teaspoons of the salts to a warm bath. Swirl around in water to mix before stepping into the bath.

Cautions for Use:

For adult use only. Possible skin sensitivity in some individuals.

Focus Your Intentions Aromatherapy Blend

A new year is often filled with new year resolutions. Many of those resolutions are forgotten before January is through. Try mediating (or just sitting quitely) with the following diffusion blend to focus your intentions for the year ahead, whatever they might be. This recipe makes approximately 3 ml of blend.

Essential Oils Chosen: Frankincense to slow the breath; basil to give clarity; sandalwood to calm; bergamot to uplift and carry forward intentions.

  • 30 drops frankincense (Boswellia carteri) essential oil

  • 25 drops basil (Ocimum basilicum) essential oil

  • 20 drops sandalwood (Santalum album) essential oil

  • 35 drops bergamot (Citrus bergamia) essential oil

How to Use:

Mix the essential oils together in a glass bottle with an orifice reducer. Add between 5 and 10 drops to a suitable aromatherapy diffuser. Consult the manufacturer’s guidelines for use.

Cautions for Use:

Avoid diffusing around those who are pregnant, young children and babies, and pets. Diffuse in a well-ventilated space.

Smooth Hands Aromatherapy Blend

Winter weather can be unkind to your skin, with winter winds, rain, snow, and freezing temperatures. Hands tend to suffer the most, unless we remember to wear gloves. This skin smoothing blend will help to keep your hands free from chapping, and prepare them for warmer, spring days. Use just a 1% dilution to avoid any possible skin sensitivity; increase to 2% if the situation dictates.

Essential Oils Chosen: Palmarosa for moisturizing and stimulation of skin cell regeneration; geranium for all types of skin care; amyris to fix the blend; cedarwood for drying skin conditions.

  • 8 oz unscented cream base*

  • 20 drops palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii) essential oil

  • 10 drops geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil

  • 10 drops amyris (Amyris balsamifera) essential oil

  • 8 drops cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica) essential oil

* I recommend using a cream base for this blend as it contains more oil and it not as drying as water-based lotions.

How to Use:

Mix the essential oils well into the cream base in a suitable container. Apply as needed to the hands.

Cautions for Use:

Avoid use in pregnancy.

The Study of Aromatherapy

To learn more about how aromatherapy blends are used in aromatherapy practice, consider the Sedona Aromatherapie Linguistics of AromaticsTM program!

  • The author of this article has a 20 year history in the health care and aromatherapy industry. She is UK-certified aromatherapist and a NAHA Certified Professional Aromatherapist (R). She is both a published author and editor in aromatherapy, a consultant, custom blend formulator and herbal studies student. She is the author of Authentic Aromatherapy and the current chief editor of the NAHA Aromatherapy Journal. She has taken the online Master Gardener short course series with the University of Oregon. Sharon works from her garden studio in Sedona, Arizona, where she is in the process of creating her own aromatic stillroom on her one acre homestead and aromatic gardens.

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